Skip to content
design lab ucsd lara mangravite

Future of Public Health Research: Joint-Collaboration Event Sparks Agile Healthcare Discussion

Future of Public Health Research: Joint-Collaboration Event Sparks Agile Healthcare Discussion

Future of Public Health Research: Joint-Collaboration Event Sparks Agile Healthcare Discussion

This past May, the Design Lab hosted The Future of Public Health Research event in collaboration with the Institute of Public Health at UC San Diego, the Qualcomm Institute, the Center for Wireless and Population Health Systems, and local industry partners. The event united scholars and practitioners from diverse disciplines such as business, design, engineering, medicine and public policy. The event was driven by a collective interest in exploring why public health research may need to change, how that change can be designed in an impactful, human-centric way, and the roles that various groups play in contributing to a new vision of public health. Throughout the day, academic and industry speakers working within the sphere of public health alongside health advocates, shared their insights on panels and facilitated a wider discussion to engage attendees concerning the critical issues that need to be addressed.


(Pictured Left to Right: Kevin Patrick, Professor, Family Medicine and Public Health; Don Norman, Director of the Design Lab)

The discussion-style nature of the event encouraged attendees to delve deeply into the emerging public health conversation. Among the key areas of focus included identifying participatory stakeholders and leaders within the space, the roles of various disciplines in effecting change and the support that must be in place to enable the successful transformation of current systems. Speakers highlighted several themes that transcend both presentations and panel discussions which included the idea of global design, forging strong connections with clinical systems to inspire a continuum of prevention and intervention in addition to a call to acknowledge the need to examine gaps in existing solutions. “My sense was that, as said by Dr. Aronoff-Spencer of the Design Lab, there is a deep hunger for bringing the public truly and meaningfully into public health,” said Eric Hekler, Director of the Center for Population and Wireless Health Systems.


(Pictured: Lara Mangravite, President, Sage Bionetworks)

Michèle Morris, Associate Director of The Design Lab, hopes that attendees gained a greater understanding of and empathy for the public health ecosystem at the event, while successfully expanding their personal and professional networks to pave the way for collaborative discovery. The event provided a launchpad for continued dialogue surrounding cross-disciplinary efforts and initiatives. Dr. Doug Ziedonis, Associate Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences, echoed similar sentiments stating his excitement and enthusiasm for the growing momentum of public health at UC San Diego to fuel innovation. “Design thinking is about being part of the doing and not simply the theory. It is vital to look at the needs of the population through the eyes of the population.” Ziedonis is looking forward to taking part in weaving design thinking into public health research through exploring applications of data science and human-computer interaction. Finally, Dr. Michael Pratt, Director of the Institute for Public Health at UC San Diego stated, “What a wonderful event to stimulate creative thinking and discussion about a multi-sectoral future for public health. More importantly this is a jumping off point for a new School of Public Health here at UC San Diego where we can truly put these concepts into action and positivity impact population health in San Diego and the world!”


(Pictured Left to Right: Michael Pratt, Director of the Institute for Public Health; Larry Smarr, Founding Director of CalIT2; Doug Ziedonis, Associate Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences; Cheryl Anderson, Associate Director and Interim Department Chair, Family Medicine and Public Health)

The next installment of this event will revolve around strengthening the exchange of ideas through translating new interactions between attendees into platforms for growth into  actionable work. Presenting attendees with the environment to unearth challenges and navigate evolving topics across varying expertise will create opportunities to develop an agile framework for public health solutions.

This past May, the Design Lab hosted The Future of Public Health Research event in collaboration with the Institute of Public Health at UC San Diego, the Qualcomm Institute, the Center for Wireless and Population Health Systems, and local industry partners. The event united scholars and practitioners from diverse disciplines such as business, design, engineering, medicine and public policy. The event was driven by a collective interest in exploring why public health research may need to change, how that change can be designed in an impactful, human-centric way, and the roles that various groups play in contributing to a new vision of public health. Throughout the day, academic and industry speakers working within the sphere of public health alongside health advocates, shared their insights on panels and facilitated a wider discussion to engage attendees concerning the critical issues that need to be addressed.


(Pictured Left to Right: Kevin Patrick, Professor, Family Medicine and Public Health; Don Norman, Director of the Design Lab)

The discussion-style nature of the event encouraged attendees to delve deeply into the emerging public health conversation. Among the key areas of focus included identifying participatory stakeholders and leaders within the space, the roles of various disciplines in effecting change and the support that must be in place to enable the successful transformation of current systems. Speakers highlighted several themes that transcend both presentations and panel discussions which included the idea of global design, forging strong connections with clinical systems to inspire a continuum of prevention and intervention in addition to a call to acknowledge the need to examine gaps in existing solutions. “My sense was that, as said by Dr. Aronoff-Spencer of the Design Lab, there is a deep hunger for bringing the public truly and meaningfully into public health,” said Eric Hekler, Director of the Center for Population and Wireless Health Systems.


(Pictured: Lara Mangravite, President, Sage Bionetworks)

Michèle Morris, Associate Director of The Design Lab, hopes that attendees gained a greater understanding of and empathy for the public health ecosystem at the event, while successfully expanding their personal and professional networks to pave the way for collaborative discovery. The event provided a launchpad for continued dialogue surrounding cross-disciplinary efforts and initiatives. Dr. Doug Ziedonis, Associate Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences, echoed similar sentiments stating his excitement and enthusiasm for the growing momentum of public health at UC San Diego to fuel innovation. “Design thinking is about being part of the doing and not simply the theory. It is vital to look at the needs of the population through the eyes of the population.” Ziedonis is looking forward to taking part in weaving design thinking into public health research through exploring applications of data science and human-computer interaction. Finally, Dr. Michael Pratt, Director of the Institute for Public Health at UC San Diego stated, “What a wonderful event to stimulate creative thinking and discussion about a multi-sectoral future for public health. More importantly this is a jumping off point for a new School of Public Health here at UC San Diego where we can truly put these concepts into action and positivity impact population health in San Diego and the world!”


(Pictured Left to Right: Michael Pratt, Director of the Institute for Public Health; Larry Smarr, Founding Director of CalIT2; Doug Ziedonis, Associate Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences; Cheryl Anderson, Associate Director and Interim Department Chair, Family Medicine and Public Health)

The next installment of this event will revolve around strengthening the exchange of ideas through translating new interactions between attendees into platforms for growth into  actionable work. Presenting attendees with the environment to unearth challenges and navigate evolving topics across varying expertise will create opportunities to develop an agile framework for public health solutions.

This past May, the Design Lab hosted The Future of Public Health Research event in collaboration with the Institute of Public Health at UC San Diego, the Qualcomm Institute, the Center for Wireless and Population Health Systems, and local industry partners. The event united scholars and practitioners from diverse disciplines such as business, design, engineering, medicine and public policy. The event was driven by a collective interest in exploring why public health research may need to change, how that change can be designed in an impactful, human-centric way, and the roles that various groups play in contributing to a new vision of public health. Throughout the day, academic and industry speakers working within the sphere of public health alongside health advocates, shared their insights on panels and facilitated a wider discussion to engage attendees concerning the critical issues that need to be addressed.


(Pictured Left to Right: Kevin Patrick, Professor, Family Medicine and Public Health; Don Norman, Director of the Design Lab)

The discussion-style nature of the event encouraged attendees to delve deeply into the emerging public health conversation. Among the key areas of focus included identifying participatory stakeholders and leaders within the space, the roles of various disciplines in effecting change and the support that must be in place to enable the successful transformation of current systems. Speakers highlighted several themes that transcend both presentations and panel discussions which included the idea of global design, forging strong connections with clinical systems to inspire a continuum of prevention and intervention in addition to a call to acknowledge the need to examine gaps in existing solutions. “My sense was that, as said by Dr. Aronoff-Spencer of the Design Lab, there is a deep hunger for bringing the public truly and meaningfully into public health,” said Eric Hekler, Director of the Center for Population and Wireless Health Systems.


(Pictured: Lara Mangravite, President, Sage Bionetworks)

Michèle Morris, Associate Director of The Design Lab, hopes that attendees gained a greater understanding of and empathy for the public health ecosystem at the event, while successfully expanding their personal and professional networks to pave the way for collaborative discovery. The event provided a launchpad for continued dialogue surrounding cross-disciplinary efforts and initiatives. Dr. Doug Ziedonis, Associate Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences, echoed similar sentiments stating his excitement and enthusiasm for the growing momentum of public health at UC San Diego to fuel innovation. “Design thinking is about being part of the doing and not simply the theory. It is vital to look at the needs of the population through the eyes of the population.” Ziedonis is looking forward to taking part in weaving design thinking into public health research through exploring applications of data science and human-computer interaction. Finally, Dr. Michael Pratt, Director of the Institute for Public Health at UC San Diego stated, “What a wonderful event to stimulate creative thinking and discussion about a multi-sectoral future for public health. More importantly this is a jumping off point for a new School of Public Health here at UC San Diego where we can truly put these concepts into action and positivity impact population health in San Diego and the world!”


(Pictured Left to Right: Michael Pratt, Director of the Institute for Public Health; Larry Smarr, Founding Director of CalIT2; Doug Ziedonis, Associate Vice Chancellor for Health Sciences; Cheryl Anderson, Associate Director and Interim Department Chair, Family Medicine and Public Health)

The next installment of this event will revolve around strengthening the exchange of ideas through translating new interactions between attendees into platforms for growth into  actionable work. Presenting attendees with the environment to unearth challenges and navigate evolving topics across varying expertise will create opportunities to develop an agile framework for public health solutions.

Read Next

SPUR Team 1

In an academic environment teeming with opportunities and talent, a common narrative persists: the notion…

Design Lab’s Edward Wang Wins NIH R21 For Work On Smartphone-based Alzheimer’s Screening

Design Lab’s Edward Wang wins NIH R21 for work on Smartphone-based Alzheimer’s Screening

Design Lab’s Edward Wang, who is a jointly appointed professor in Electrical & Computer Engineering in Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, wins a National Institutes of Health (NIH) R21 through the National Institute of Aging (NIA) for his work around transforming smartphones into pocket-sized personal health monitors. 

The NIA has selected Design Lab’s Edward Wang, who directs the Digital Health Lab, to receive NIH R21 funding for his work with Co-investigator Eric Granholm, Director of UCSD’s Center for Mental Health Technology (MHTech), to develop a smartphone app that can screen for early signs of cognitive decline indicative of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). An NIH R21, also known as the Exploratory/Development Grant, provides support in the early and conceptual stages of a project’s development. As part of a national push towards combating the debilitating effects of AD, the National Institute of Aging looked towards funding novel ways to screen for AD through the use of digital technologies. 
Design Education Don Norman

The Future of Design Education

Don Norman, Design Lab Director, reports on "The Future of Design Education"

Many of you know that for a long time I have been partnering with IBM Design and The World Design Organization to rethink the curriculum for design.  This is a progress report.

The History

It all started in March 2014 when Scott Klemmer and I wrote a paper called "State of Design: How Design Education Must Change" published in LinkedIn. (Why LinkedIn? Because of the wide, diverse readership: This paper has been read by 50,167 people, with 93 comments.) https://bit.ly/31Qqv1W

Design Lab

When Scott, Jim Hollan, and I started the Design Lab, we knew what we did NOT wish to do: build a traditional design education. Our training was rich and varied, and we wanted our students to have a similarly broad education. We wanted to do things that made a real difference in the world. After all, our origin was from Cognitive Science and computers -- Human Behavior and Technology, Design is an applied field that requires multi-disciplinary approaches to important, difficult issues.
Waste Management

Waste is an enormous problem. But recycling is the wrong solution.

Part 2 of a FastCompany editorial on Recycling by Don Norman

I am proud to be one of the developers of what is today called human-centered design. That is design that always starts off understanding the needs, capabilities, and desires of people. It has four basic principles, all four of which are being violated by today’s recycling craze.

Recycling is broken. There’s little clarity about what can and can’t be recycled, and the rules change from one city to the next, and sometimes even within the same city. According to the World Bank, we produce 1.4 billion tons of waste a year worldwide, a figure that’s expected to increase to 2.4 billion tons by 2025. Waste is an enormous problem that needs to be addressed if we’re going to prevent the worst effects of climate change. But recycling is the wrong solution.
Mai Nguyen

Meet Mai Nguyen, UC San Diego New Director of the Design Lab

Mai Nguyen began her role as Director of The Design Lab in March of this year, but she will be making the move from her long-time home of Chapel Hill, North Carolina to San Diego this summer. Her excitement beams because, having grown up in Orange and Riverside counties, she considers herself a native Californian. “For me, this is coming home to a place that I’m very familiar with; a place that I saw grow and develop and become what it is today.” It is precisely witnessing the development of these regions over time that inspired her to pursue her graduate studies in sociology and urban planning . “I watched the Southern California landscape get dotted by more and more development and traffic--where sprawl met the wall. I also saw the lack of foresight and  planning—our policies, our practices, our design of space really created so many other problems because we didn’t think about the long-term consequences of our growth and development. So I come back to The Design Lab with that background.”

The Worst F&#%ing Words Ever

Triton Magazine

Benjamin Bergen is a professor of cognitive science at UC San Diego and director of the Language and Cognition Lab, where he studies how our minds compute meaning and how talking interferes with safe driving—among many other things that don’t need to be bleeped. His latest book is What the F: What Swearing Reveals About Our Language, Our Brains, and Ourselves. He calls it “a book-length love letter to profanity.” You’ve been warned.
Back To Top