Skip to content

SPUR Team 10

SPUR Team 10

SPUR Team 10

SPUR TEAM 10

The team addresses a fundamental challenge in the academic environment: enhancing the understanding between staff, faculty, administrators, and undergraduate students to foster a productive mentorship culture. This initiative seeks to bridge the gap between these groups, ensuring that students can engage effectively in research activities and that faculty and administrators are equipped to provide the necessary support and guidance.

The project was conceived to improve the interactions between undergraduate students, faculty, and administrators in the context of research and mentorship. Recognizing students’ diverse backgrounds and needs, alongside the responsibilities and challenges faced by faculty and administrators, this project aims to establish a comprehensive framework that facilitates meaningful mentorship experiences.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

The primary challenge identified is the need to help staff, faculty, and administrators better understand undergraduate students in a way that provides a structured approach to mentorship. 

How might we help staff, faculty, and administrators better understand undergraduate students in a way that provides a framework, activities, and rubrics for mentorship.

This includes the development of frameworks, activities, and rubrics that can guide the mentorship process effectively.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Discover: Stakeholders

Students: This group includes undergraduates from various research backgrounds and academic levels, emphasizing the inclusion of those without prior research experience and transfer or upperclassmen students.

Researchers (Faculty): Faculty members involved in laboratory work and advising students on research aspects, playing a crucial role in shaping the research experience.

Administrators: Individuals responsible for managing programs and logistics related to student research opportunities. This category sometimes overlaps with researchers.

DEFINE

Define: Student Engagement

Key insights from engaging with students revealed:

  • The daunting nature of initiating research activities for novices.
  • The significant challenge transfer and upperclassmen face in securing research positions.
  • A expressed desire for more insight into the administrative aspects of research.
  • The need for practical demonstrations, especially concerning the use of expensive equipment.

Define: Faculty & Administrator Engagement

Feedback from faculty and administrators highlighted:

  • The perception of undergraduate research as a teaching responsibility conflicts with research duties.
  • The importance of selecting appropriate research projects for students’ skill levels.
  • The necessity of introducing undergraduates to professional norms and networks.

Updated Problem Statement

How might we help staff, faculty, administrators, and undergraduate students bridge the gap in their relationships to foster a productive mentorship culture.

DEVELOP

1. Establish a Timeline

Creating a flexible yet clear timeline for research activities is crucial. This timeline should account for the variable nature of research projects and aim to define clear objectives and milestones for both students and faculty.

2. Structure a Rubric

Developing a rubric requires a thorough understanding of students’ and researchers’ expectations and goals. This involves:

  • Engaging in dialogue with all parties to align expectations.
  • Crafting a rubric reflecting these shared goals facilitates a productive and mutually beneficial mentorship experience.
Summary and Key Takeaways

This project endeavors to foster a nurturing environment where undergraduate students can thrive under the guidance of faculty and administrators. By addressing the gaps in understanding and expectations between these groups, we aim to create a more cohesive and supportive research community. The following steps, including establishing a timeline and structuring a rubric, are vital in moving towards a more structured and effective mentorship framework.

  • Early career faculty often lack the support needed for effective mentorship.
  • There is a notable tension between mentoring responsibilities and research productivity.
  • Faculty may not be adequately prepared to scaffold tasks for novice researchers.
Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further understand a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Edward Olano, URH
  • Stanley Lo, Teaching Professor, Cell and Developmental Biology
  • Emma (Artemis) Lopez, Student, Cognitive Science (Design/Int)
  • Pallavi Singamsetty, Student, Neurobiology
  • Janzen Molina, Student, Cognitive Science (Design/Int)
  • A.S.H. Harris, Student, Mechanical Engineering / Junior Designer Program
Team 10 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 10

The team addresses a fundamental challenge in the academic environment: enhancing the understanding between staff, faculty, administrators, and undergraduate students to foster a productive mentorship culture. This initiative seeks to bridge the gap between these groups, ensuring that students can engage effectively in research activities and that faculty and administrators are equipped to provide the necessary support and guidance.

The project was conceived to improve the interactions between undergraduate students, faculty, and administrators in the context of research and mentorship. Recognizing students’ diverse backgrounds and needs, alongside the responsibilities and challenges faced by faculty and administrators, this project aims to establish a comprehensive framework that facilitates meaningful mentorship experiences.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

The primary challenge identified is the need to help staff, faculty, and administrators better understand undergraduate students in a way that provides a structured approach to mentorship. 

How might we help staff, faculty, and administrators better understand undergraduate students in a way that provides a framework, activities, and rubrics for mentorship.

This includes the development of frameworks, activities, and rubrics that can guide the mentorship process effectively.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Discover: Stakeholders

Students: This group includes undergraduates from various research backgrounds and academic levels, emphasizing the inclusion of those without prior research experience and transfer or upperclassmen students.

Researchers (Faculty): Faculty members involved in laboratory work and advising students on research aspects, playing a crucial role in shaping the research experience.

Administrators: Individuals responsible for managing programs and logistics related to student research opportunities. This category sometimes overlaps with researchers.

DEFINE

Define: Student Engagement

Key insights from engaging with students revealed:

  • The daunting nature of initiating research activities for novices.
  • The significant challenge transfer and upperclassmen face in securing research positions.
  • A expressed desire for more insight into the administrative aspects of research.
  • The need for practical demonstrations, especially concerning the use of expensive equipment.

Define: Faculty & Administrator Engagement

Feedback from faculty and administrators highlighted:

  • The perception of undergraduate research as a teaching responsibility conflicts with research duties.
  • The importance of selecting appropriate research projects for students’ skill levels.
  • The necessity of introducing undergraduates to professional norms and networks.

Updated Problem Statement

How might we help staff, faculty, administrators, and undergraduate students bridge the gap in their relationships to foster a productive mentorship culture.

DEVELOP

1. Establish a Timeline

Creating a flexible yet clear timeline for research activities is crucial. This timeline should account for the variable nature of research projects and aim to define clear objectives and milestones for both students and faculty.

2. Structure a Rubric

Developing a rubric requires a thorough understanding of students’ and researchers’ expectations and goals. This involves:

  • Engaging in dialogue with all parties to align expectations.
  • Crafting a rubric reflecting these shared goals facilitates a productive and mutually beneficial mentorship experience.
Summary and Key Takeaways

This project endeavors to foster a nurturing environment where undergraduate students can thrive under the guidance of faculty and administrators. By addressing the gaps in understanding and expectations between these groups, we aim to create a more cohesive and supportive research community. The following steps, including establishing a timeline and structuring a rubric, are vital in moving towards a more structured and effective mentorship framework.

  • Early career faculty often lack the support needed for effective mentorship.
  • There is a notable tension between mentoring responsibilities and research productivity.
  • Faculty may not be adequately prepared to scaffold tasks for novice researchers.
Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further understand a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Edward Olano, URH
  • Stanley Lo, Teaching Professor, Cell and Developmental Biology
  • Emma (Artemis) Lopez, Student, Cognitive Science (Design/Int)
  • Pallavi Singamsetty, Student, Neurobiology
  • Janzen Molina, Student, Cognitive Science (Design/Int)
  • A.S.H. Harris, Student, Mechanical Engineering / Junior Designer Program
Team 10 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 10

The team addresses a fundamental challenge in the academic environment: enhancing the understanding between staff, faculty, administrators, and undergraduate students to foster a productive mentorship culture. This initiative seeks to bridge the gap between these groups, ensuring that students can engage effectively in research activities and that faculty and administrators are equipped to provide the necessary support and guidance.

The project was conceived to improve the interactions between undergraduate students, faculty, and administrators in the context of research and mentorship. Recognizing students’ diverse backgrounds and needs, alongside the responsibilities and challenges faced by faculty and administrators, this project aims to establish a comprehensive framework that facilitates meaningful mentorship experiences.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

The primary challenge identified is the need to help staff, faculty, and administrators better understand undergraduate students in a way that provides a structured approach to mentorship. 

How might we help staff, faculty, and administrators better understand undergraduate students in a way that provides a framework, activities, and rubrics for mentorship.

This includes the development of frameworks, activities, and rubrics that can guide the mentorship process effectively.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Discover: Stakeholders

Students: This group includes undergraduates from various research backgrounds and academic levels, emphasizing the inclusion of those without prior research experience and transfer or upperclassmen students.

Researchers (Faculty): Faculty members involved in laboratory work and advising students on research aspects, playing a crucial role in shaping the research experience.

Administrators: Individuals responsible for managing programs and logistics related to student research opportunities. This category sometimes overlaps with researchers.

DEFINE

Define: Student Engagement

Key insights from engaging with students revealed:

  • The daunting nature of initiating research activities for novices.
  • The significant challenge transfer and upperclassmen face in securing research positions.
  • A expressed desire for more insight into the administrative aspects of research.
  • The need for practical demonstrations, especially concerning the use of expensive equipment.

Define: Faculty & Administrator Engagement

Feedback from faculty and administrators highlighted:

  • The perception of undergraduate research as a teaching responsibility conflicts with research duties.
  • The importance of selecting appropriate research projects for students’ skill levels.
  • The necessity of introducing undergraduates to professional norms and networks.

Updated Problem Statement

How might we help staff, faculty, administrators, and undergraduate students bridge the gap in their relationships to foster a productive mentorship culture.

DEVELOP

1. Establish a Timeline

Creating a flexible yet clear timeline for research activities is crucial. This timeline should account for the variable nature of research projects and aim to define clear objectives and milestones for both students and faculty.

2. Structure a Rubric

Developing a rubric requires a thorough understanding of students’ and researchers’ expectations and goals. This involves:

  • Engaging in dialogue with all parties to align expectations.
  • Crafting a rubric reflecting these shared goals facilitates a productive and mutually beneficial mentorship experience.
Summary and Key Takeaways

This project endeavors to foster a nurturing environment where undergraduate students can thrive under the guidance of faculty and administrators. By addressing the gaps in understanding and expectations between these groups, we aim to create a more cohesive and supportive research community. The following steps, including establishing a timeline and structuring a rubric, are vital in moving towards a more structured and effective mentorship framework.

  • Early career faculty often lack the support needed for effective mentorship.
  • There is a notable tension between mentoring responsibilities and research productivity.
  • Faculty may not be adequately prepared to scaffold tasks for novice researchers.
Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further understand a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Edward Olano, URH
  • Stanley Lo, Teaching Professor, Cell and Developmental Biology
  • Emma (Artemis) Lopez, Student, Cognitive Science (Design/Int)
  • Pallavi Singamsetty, Student, Neurobiology
  • Janzen Molina, Student, Cognitive Science (Design/Int)
  • A.S.H. Harris, Student, Mechanical Engineering / Junior Designer Program
Team 10 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

Read Next

Don Norman To Receive Sir Misha Black Medal

Don Norman to Receive Sir Misha Black Medal for Distinguished Services to Design Education

The Sir Misha Black Medal for Distinguished Services to Design Education for 2021 is awarded to Don Norman, Design Lab Founding Director Emeritus and Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the University of California, San Diego, USA.

He will receive the Medal at a Ceremony to be held at Imperial College London, at 6pm on Tuesday, October 19th 2021, where he will deliver a short address on his philosophy on design education.

This Ceremony will be combined with the Awarding of the 2020 Medal and the 2020 Awards for Innovation in Design Education.

The Sir Misha Black Medal honours those who have given distinguished services to design education. It was the first, and is the only, international award to do so. The Awards commemorate the work and life of the designer and architect, Professor Sir Misha Black, whose pioneering work played a crucial role in the development of design in Britain.
How I Talked To My Daughter About Body Image

How I talked to my daughter-and myself-about body image

Design Lab member Shannon Master recently had her article published in TIME magazine's special edition on weight loss! Her work can be found on shelves across the nation from April 12 - July 12.

Below is an excerpt from Shannon's essay Does this mean I'm a real writer? where she discusses the article for TIME magazine.

"How I talked to my daughter-and myself-about body image...tackles important social issues surrounding body-image for young girls, their mothers, and women at large. It offers research on how mothers can not only help stop the cycle of negative body image in their young daughters, but also how moms as women themselves can work to improve their own body-image. I was surprised that the editors changed very little, except for the title, which is amazing considering this thing magically ejected itself out of me in a matter of days, rather than the weeks and months I can work on something that never sees the light of day. It looks pretty spiffy in its new home, complete with updated statistics and accompanying photos across an eight-page spread; eight pages of my words about how we can reframe our own body images as mothers, in order to help our girls have everything we never had—confidence and self-esteem with an unwavering sense of worth—in a frickn’ national publication."

Read more at shannonmaster.com

World Design Capital San Diego Tijuana Campus Convening on Dec 9th

It is with great pleasure that we invite you to submit your project and join our first World Design Capital San Diego Tijuana 2024 Campus Convening on December 9, 2022, held at the UCSD Design Lab in the Design and Innovation building between 2.00-5.00pm...
Design Lab Sheng-feng Qin

Spotlight on Sheng-feng Qin: His take on Design from China to the UK and US

Sheng-feng Qin is a professor at the University of Northumbria at Newcastle in the School…

Announcing The New Graduate Student Specialization In Human-centered Design

Announcing the new Graduate Student Specialization in Human-centered Design

Image courtesy of Adobe Stock

Announcing the new Graduate Student Specialization in Human-centered Design in partnership with the UC San Diego Design Lab, Cognitive Science (CogSci), Computer Science and Engineering (CSE), and Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science (HWSPH).

The Design Graduate Specialization is a set of courses graduate students can choose to take that fit into their home degree program requirements. It is analogous to receiving a minor, but at the graduate level. The courses fit into their home program as either electives or as courses that were already part of their core requirements, plus the option to take courses from other programs taking part in the specialization outside of their home program. In addition, students will be required to take at least one course that explicitly addresses and discusses issues of power, privilege, and ethical responses. The Design Graduate Specialization is created so that it can be integrated into a one or two-year Master program or a Ph.D. program.
Design Lab Faculty

New Design Lab Faculty Working to Shape the Future of UC San Diego

As a global pioneer in design thinking, research, and invention, The Design Lab prides itself on recruiting the brightest and most innovative minds in the design field. Today, we would like to extend a warm welcome to brand new faculty members Elizabeth Eikey, Haijun Xia, and Edward Wang!

Elizabeth Eikey
From a first-generation undergraduate student at Penn State, then an inquisitive Best Buy employee and finally, to the Assistant Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health & The Design Lab at UCSD, Dr. Elizabeth Eikey has an illustrious career. Her research work at The Design Lab focuses on the intersection between technology, mental health, and equity, primarily studying the possible applications for technology in supporting mental health and well-being.

Haijun Xia
After receiving his PhD in Computer Science from University of Toronto, Xia made the move across countries to begin his time as a researcher at UC San Diego. ‘I wanted to work at The Design Lab and UC San Diego, because of the diversity of skill here,’ says the Professor, ‘We are all approaching the many challenging research questions from different angles, which is really important to develop comprehensive solutions.

Edward Wang
When Edward Wang was an undergraduate student at Harvey Mudd, he never expected himself to become a researcher, let alone becoming a professor. It was only after a Professor offered him the chance to help design a course she was planning about biosignal processing, that he began on this path. ‘As I was designing the class over summer, I had to read a bunch of papers,’ he says, ‘I couldn’t stop thinking about how cool all of it was. Especially when it branched out into computer science and how it could be involved in biosignal processes.’
Back To Top