Skip to content

SPUR Team 3

SPUR Team 3

SPUR Team 3

SPUR TEAM 3

This story showcases our team’s research and discoveries, primarily focusing on broadening undergraduate students’ research opportunities.

To share what we learned, we will first unpack our problem statement and then share what we learned through our research and interviews using the stakeholder and empathy mapping tools.

We conclude by defining potential pathways and outlining a framework that lays the foundation to scale paid undergraduate research.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

Our starting problem statement was, “How might we help undergraduate students understand the meaning of research to increase interest, engagement, and readiness.”

From our initial discussions, we explored this problem by examining how students see themselves in research and how students and faculty perceive the value and impact of research. We also found secondary research and additional information from our interviews essential to further understand this problem.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Discover: Stakeholder Map

To examine these ideas, we identified and talked with three groups of stakeholders – students, faculty, and administrators. 

In talking with students, we saw they had a limited idea of what research could be for them.  We also learned how much they value guidance from faculty about how to engage in research.

From administrators, we learned about existing programs to help undergraduate students go into research, which gave us insight into how we should structure our potential solutions.

We heard from faculty how much they value working with students and that engaging students in research takes careful planning and deliberate engagement.

Discover: Empathy Map

We took this data and created empathy maps to understand the perspectives of our stakeholders. 

For example, in mapping the input from faculty using the AEIOU tool, we heard that they often think of the lecture hall, office hours, and classroom as primary interaction points for finding students to partner with in research. In talking with administrators, we heard how they often think about enabling collaboration, ideation, and communication to help create new programs. We heard from both administrators and faculty about the value produced when you bring people together to build shared insight and provide guidance to each other.

Students told us they needed guidance on how to successfully approach faculty for research using elevator pitches or interviews. Students discussed various strategies, such as talking with counselors and attending mentor/mentee meetings to build relevant skills. A key takeaway we heard was that students are seeking help developing a portfolio they can use to increase their access to research opportunities.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further the understanding of a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Erik Mitchell, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian
  • Leslie Carver, Provost, Thurgood Marshall College,
  • Stuart Sandin, Professor, Biological Oceanography, Marine Biology, Scripps
  • Andrea Ventura, Student, Business Psychology, Cognitive Sciences
  • Akira Wolfe, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )
  • Kayla Maldonado, Int Business & CogSci (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences 
  • Elise Kim, Student, Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences / Junior Designer Program
Team 3 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 3

This story showcases our team’s research and discoveries, primarily focusing on broadening undergraduate students’ research opportunities.

To share what we learned, we will first unpack our problem statement and then share what we learned through our research and interviews using the stakeholder and empathy mapping tools.

We conclude by defining potential pathways and outlining a framework that lays the foundation to scale paid undergraduate research.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

Our starting problem statement was, “How might we help undergraduate students understand the meaning of research to increase interest, engagement, and readiness.”

From our initial discussions, we explored this problem by examining how students see themselves in research and how students and faculty perceive the value and impact of research. We also found secondary research and additional information from our interviews essential to further understand this problem.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Discover: Stakeholder Map

To examine these ideas, we identified and talked with three groups of stakeholders – students, faculty, and administrators. 

In talking with students, we saw they had a limited idea of what research could be for them.  We also learned how much they value guidance from faculty about how to engage in research.

From administrators, we learned about existing programs to help undergraduate students go into research, which gave us insight into how we should structure our potential solutions.

We heard from faculty how much they value working with students and that engaging students in research takes careful planning and deliberate engagement.

Discover: Empathy Map

We took this data and created empathy maps to understand the perspectives of our stakeholders. 

For example, in mapping the input from faculty using the AEIOU tool, we heard that they often think of the lecture hall, office hours, and classroom as primary interaction points for finding students to partner with in research. In talking with administrators, we heard how they often think about enabling collaboration, ideation, and communication to help create new programs. We heard from both administrators and faculty about the value produced when you bring people together to build shared insight and provide guidance to each other.

Students told us they needed guidance on how to successfully approach faculty for research using elevator pitches or interviews. Students discussed various strategies, such as talking with counselors and attending mentor/mentee meetings to build relevant skills. A key takeaway we heard was that students are seeking help developing a portfolio they can use to increase their access to research opportunities.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further the understanding of a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Erik Mitchell, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian
  • Leslie Carver, Provost, Thurgood Marshall College,
  • Stuart Sandin, Professor, Biological Oceanography, Marine Biology, Scripps
  • Andrea Ventura, Student, Business Psychology, Cognitive Sciences
  • Akira Wolfe, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )
  • Kayla Maldonado, Int Business & CogSci (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences 
  • Elise Kim, Student, Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences / Junior Designer Program
Team 3 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

SPUR TEAM 3

This story showcases our team’s research and discoveries, primarily focusing on broadening undergraduate students’ research opportunities.

To share what we learned, we will first unpack our problem statement and then share what we learned through our research and interviews using the stakeholder and empathy mapping tools.

We conclude by defining potential pathways and outlining a framework that lays the foundation to scale paid undergraduate research.

PROBLEM STATEMENT

Our starting problem statement was, “How might we help undergraduate students understand the meaning of research to increase interest, engagement, and readiness.”

From our initial discussions, we explored this problem by examining how students see themselves in research and how students and faculty perceive the value and impact of research. We also found secondary research and additional information from our interviews essential to further understand this problem.

Evaluate This Project
DISCOVER

Discover: Stakeholder Map

To examine these ideas, we identified and talked with three groups of stakeholders – students, faculty, and administrators. 

In talking with students, we saw they had a limited idea of what research could be for them.  We also learned how much they value guidance from faculty about how to engage in research.

From administrators, we learned about existing programs to help undergraduate students go into research, which gave us insight into how we should structure our potential solutions.

We heard from faculty how much they value working with students and that engaging students in research takes careful planning and deliberate engagement.

Discover: Empathy Map

We took this data and created empathy maps to understand the perspectives of our stakeholders. 

For example, in mapping the input from faculty using the AEIOU tool, we heard that they often think of the lecture hall, office hours, and classroom as primary interaction points for finding students to partner with in research. In talking with administrators, we heard how they often think about enabling collaboration, ideation, and communication to help create new programs. We heard from both administrators and faculty about the value produced when you bring people together to build shared insight and provide guidance to each other.

Students told us they needed guidance on how to successfully approach faculty for research using elevator pitches or interviews. Students discussed various strategies, such as talking with counselors and attending mentor/mentee meetings to build relevant skills. A key takeaway we heard was that students are seeking help developing a portfolio they can use to increase their access to research opportunities.

Project Team Members

This team collaborated during the SPUR 1.0 program term to further the understanding of a problem statement and develop a potential solution. We recognize the collaborative work of the individuals who furthered our community’s knowledge of scaling paid undergraduate research.

  • Erik Mitchell, The Audrey Geisel University Librarian
  • Leslie Carver, Provost, Thurgood Marshall College,
  • Stuart Sandin, Professor, Biological Oceanography, Marine Biology, Scripps
  • Andrea Ventura, Student, Business Psychology, Cognitive Sciences
  • Akira Wolfe, Student, Cognitive Sciences (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences )
  • Kayla Maldonado, Int Business & CogSci (Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences 
  • Elise Kim, Student, Design & Interdisciplinary Sciences / Junior Designer Program
Team 3 Project Evaluation

Thank you for evaluating this and other SPUR Team projects. Each evaluation takes approximately 2-minutes to complete.

Please review the story and answer the five questions based on your knowledge, experience, and perspective. Your feedback will help us to learn, work, and develop ideas that will impact paid undergraduate research opportunities at UC San Diego.

Read Next

Philip Guo

Philip Guo on Storytelling in Design | Design Chats

Philip Guo, Design Lab member and Associate Professor in Cognitive Science at UC San Diego, speaks on the importance of capturing stories during the design process.

Design Chats is a video series where we sit down with design practitioners to answer questions about how they utilize human-centered design.

View our Design Chats playlist on the Design Lab YouTube Channel
Design Education Don Norman

The Future of Design Education

Don Norman, Design Lab Director, reports on "The Future of Design Education"

Many of you know that for a long time I have been partnering with IBM Design and The World Design Organization to rethink the curriculum for design.  This is a progress report.

The History

It all started in March 2014 when Scott Klemmer and I wrote a paper called "State of Design: How Design Education Must Change" published in LinkedIn. (Why LinkedIn? Because of the wide, diverse readership: This paper has been read by 50,167 people, with 93 comments.) https://bit.ly/31Qqv1W

Design Lab

When Scott, Jim Hollan, and I started the Design Lab, we knew what we did NOT wish to do: build a traditional design education. Our training was rich and varied, and we wanted our students to have a similarly broad education. We wanted to do things that made a real difference in the world. After all, our origin was from Cognitive Science and computers -- Human Behavior and Technology, Design is an applied field that requires multi-disciplinary approaches to important, difficult issues.
San Diego And Tijuana Selected As 2024 World Design Capital

San Diego And Tijuana Selected As 2024 World Design Capital

US-Mexico Border Cities Win Historic Designation to Become First Binational Design Capital

SAN DIEGO-TIJUANA - Today the World Design Organization (WDO) announced the San Diego-Tijuana region has been selected as the World Design Capital (WDC) for 2024.

The selection of the San Diego-Tijuana joint bid makes it the first binational World Design Capital in WDO history. While the designation is for both cities as a united region, San Diego is now the first U.S. city ever to receive the WDC designation. Tijuana is the second city in Mexico to hold the title, following Mexico City in 2018.

"We did it!" said Don Norman, founder of UC San Diego’s Design Lab (now retired) and co-founder and Board advisor to the Design Forward Alliance (DFA). "Designers, city officials, and organizations in both the Tijuana and San Diego regions collaborated to make our binational community the World Design Capital for 2024. It shows the power of design as a way of thinking, to address important societal issues, and as a source of innovation for companies, organizations, and educational communities at all levels. We have built a permanent coalition of our communities to address civic and climate challenges, to grow our industrial sectors, and to support a strong culture of cross-border design."
Designathon

Designing UC San Diego’s New Trolley Stop | Pepper Canyon Mobility Hub Designathon Video

Watch the 14-minute Pepper Canyon Mobility Hub Designathon Video

Over 250 UC San Diego students, neighbors, and future transit users gathered on April 6-7, 2019 for the first-ever Designathon: an intensive, immersive event where interdisciplinary teams design solutions for real-world challenges. This Designathon focused on the Pepper Canyon Station, which aspires to be an ecologically, socially, and technologically friendly mobility hub on the UCSD campus, set to open in 2020.

Executive Producer: Michele Morris
Producers & Directors: Stephanie Sherman, Ash Eliza Smith, Ian Strelsky
Camera Operators: Clint Evangelista, Qiyi Fan, Alice Medrano, Steven Phung, Yimeng Sun
Editors: Steven Phung, Yimeng Sun
Story Consultant: Griffin Middelson
Animators: Weilun Yao, Lilly Gee
Sound Designers: Steven Phung
Music Composers: Remy Rose, Riain Hager, Forrest Reid
Seda Evis

Designer in Residence: Seda Evis

While Seda Evis participates as a Designer-in-Residence at UC San Diego with The Design Lab, and is VP of Strategy & Growth at FreshForm Interactive—an experience design and innovation consultancy—she also claims to have what she refers to as a superpower: her hybrid mind, which she describes as the combination of two worlds: the business side and the design side.

As a Designer-in-Residence at The Design Lab,  Evis enjoys working in an interdisciplinary setting, which she says enhances her existing skillset. “Academia tends to be quite separate from how the practice is done,” she explains. “I find ways of doing interdisciplinary work, as well as cross industry work, very important for innovation because that’s how you actually get seeds from different places.” As of now, most of Evis’s work at The Design Lab has been working with the Community Team on the now winning bid for the World Design Capital 2024 (WDC) designation. Her work dovetails with her role on the Board of  Directors for the Design Forward Alliance–a non-profit organization started by the Lab in partnership with the regional design community and one of the partners co-leading the HOME 2024 WDC efforts alongside the Design Lab, Burnham Center for Community Advancement, the City of San Diego and the City of Tijuana.   The designation puts the San Diego-Tijuana region in a prestigious international cohort recognized for the “effective use of design to drive economic, social, cultural and environmental development.”  Even the proposal theme is significant, Evis says. “Home” not only refers to the immense and diverse communities of San Diego and Tijuana that form one, but also serves as an acronym for Human-centered, Open, Multi-disciplinary/Multi-cultural, and Experimental. For Evis, participating in HOME2024 signifies her career “coming full circle.” 

SPUR Team 1

In an academic environment teeming with opportunities and talent, a common narrative persists: the notion…

Back To Top